Skip to main content

About your Search

20110325
20110325
STATION
MSNBC 8
CNN 6
CSPAN 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
WETA 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CSPAN2 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> on the broadcast tonight, who's in charge? is the u.s. about to hand over control of the attack on libya? and tonight what may be the next nation to go in that region. >>> changing face. a major milestone tonight for a growing group of americans. >>> asleep in the tower. two jets needing to land in washington can't raise an air traffic controller, and now we know why. >>> and making a difference, for the struggling people of japan. nbc news with americans on a mission to provide critical relief. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it has turned into a big military effort, bombs and cruise missiles have been raining down on libya, and it could get even bigger and the stakes are high. it's been a mostly u.s. run air campaign thus far, but tonight a change is coming. a hand-over to nato for the supervision of this strike. even though the pentagon warned libya today, quote, we will continue to hit you, the u.s. is anxious to shift some of this to somebody else. and just as there have been new and loud explosions in tripoli this
weapons of the nato alliance, like this air strike by britain. and yet, u.s. military officials concede today that the libyan regime is still determined to fight and reinforced its positions in the eastern cities fwh including ajdabiya. the occasion says gadhafi is trying to recruit and arm volunteers to fight rebel forces. the libyan strongman defiant as nato moves to take over command of the libyan mission. the top u.s. commander of the operation tells me that nato has now agreed in principle to not only take charge of the no-fully zone but to also to protect libyan civilians as well. the details will be worked out, he says, over the next few erda. general carter ham sending a message directly to gadhafi. here in "the situation room," we spoke just a littlewhilego and i had this exchange with him. cnn is seen live around the world, including in libya. and officer your military-to-military -- the officers surrounding gadhafi might be watching right now, gadhafi might be watching, his sons might be watching. look into atthe camera. what would you say to them right now, officer t officer
and western attacks from the air, and we talk to the u.s. general in charge. >>> under control. a new breed of air traffic controllers tang over with fresh questions about safety still in the air. >>> and hanging tough. brave new worries about the crippled nuclear plant, but we find survivors of the japanese disaster giving everyone a lesson in resilience. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. i'm lester holt in tonight for brian williams. for a seventh straight day the u.s. and the allies bombarded targets in libya, still trying to break the back of moammar gadhafi's assault on rebel-held cities. the u.s. for its part says it's prepared to take a back seat, but exactly what the ultimate goal is and even who's in charge of this operation are still somewhat ill defined tonight. nato says it plans to take full command, but is still seeking consensus on a military strategy. in a moment we'll hear from the general in charge of u.s. forces there, but first to the ground where rebels are taking their own fight to gadhafi's forces. today nbc's r
america. [ applause ] >>> fighting intensifies in libya, as the u.s. and its allies continue attacks on government forces. the lawmakers here wonder what is the end game? this is as uprising spread to other nations raising bigger questions about the region. group of g.o.p. presidential hopefuls head to iowa. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm jim angele in for bret baier. african countries are calling for transition to lead to the democratic connections in libya. libyan government delegation is meeting in ethiopia with five african heads of state who want a roadmap for political reform there. political leaders don't have representative at the meeting. coalition forces continue to pound those loyal to gaddafi. the national correspondent jennifer griffin explains why cit exit is likely not in cards. >> good evening. on day seven of the operation over libya, command of the operation still in question and not likely to be settled before sunday at the earliest. >> a transition process that will take through the weekend, more allied pilots begone taki
, quote, in the very near future about the u.s. role going forward. the government met with the african union to hammer out a solution. there's violence in other areas of the region as well. in jordan, the associated press reports more than 100 people injured. clashes in ahman were the most i violent in that country in two months of protest. in bahrain, security forces fired tear gas and pellets at anti-government protests. thousands defied a ban on gathering followi ining prayers. and in yemen, the leader says h he's ready to step down, but only if he can leave the government in safe hands. gadhafi is now negotiating. the leaders of tunisia and egypt are already gone. yemen is on the verge of being knocked out, as you heard. these long-running dictatorships are on the ropes. why? because history is changing before our very eyes. there used to be a time when barberism and conquest was par for the course. it was what was expected. the mongols once wiped out a town and destroyed every building, but they also diverted a river that ran through the town. you want to know why? they wanted to
, briefing them to a conference call about the u.s. nato's agreement to take charge of the no-fly zone. over at the pentagon, a top adral haa story that may indicate colonel gadhafi is getting desperate. >> we received reports today that he has taken to armying what he calls volunteers to fight opposition. i'm not sure whether they truly are volunteers or not and i of these ow many recruits he's going to get but i find it interesting that he may now feel it necessary to seek civilian reinforcements. >> reporter: turning nowo the libyan capital, we're joined by cnn senior correspondent nick robertn who is in tripoli. hi, nick. libyan officials, we understand, took you to eastern tripoli today and showed you theon effes of the coalition bombing campaign. what did you see when you were on the outskirts of the city? >> reporter: well, they wanted to show us civilian casualties which they weren't able to. sho us. they took to us a farm that appeared, part of the farmland area had been struck by a missile. we couldn't tell where the missile had come from or even who had fired it. what we saw when
in the middle east and tonight a u.s. ally is on the brink. i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> the president of yemen now promising to step down on one condition. tonight what he says has to happen and what about american interests if he actually does go. plus, in syria, and in jordan, new anger and new calls for change. l we'll take you inside the growing rage in the region and see what it means for us. >> plus, in libya, nato is getting set to take over the no-fly zone but american forces are still very much a part of this war. tonight, what washington plans and is there any end game? but first on fox this friday night, white house has announced president obama will address the nation monday evening. we're told he'll focus on the situation in libya during comments from the national defense university in d.c. the address is scheduled 7:30 eastern. earlier today he updated congressional leaders on libya and a senior aide says there is no clear end game on how to remove moammar gadhafi from power. more and reaction, as the u.s. prepares to hand thato control of the no-fly zo
to support the president. nato will take over responsibility from the u.s. for enforcing the no-fly zone over libya. who is really calling the shots now in the international coalition? welcome to "bbc world news." more coming up in the program and more worries in japan about the fishermen nuclear repay. one of the reactor cores could be damaged -- about the fukushima nuclear plant. in a film that takes you into the interrogation room. we look at four days inside guantanamo. ♪ >> hello, welcome. syria has become the latest hot spot in the middle east, with the ruling elite coming under its biggest challenge in three decades. thousands have demonstrated, calling for more freedom, with protests reported in three more towns. in, protesters climbed about 20 were shot down after a statue of the former president was set alight. in damascus, three people reported to have been killed. ban ki-moon has urged the government to respect and to protect the rights of citizens. protests are taking place elsewhere across the region. in the many capital, , both pro and anti-government demonstrators held their
the u.s. toll the military personnel in japan to keep around the plant. so, we believe the evacuation zone now is voluntary evacuation but that is causing a problem for those who want to get appear because a number of people who is left but there is no gas so people have cars but have not gas for the cars. so they cannot get away from the radiation at the fukushima plants and the highly radioactive water is leaking from four of the troubled nuclear reactors and they think it is seeping out from reactor number three the troublesome of the lot of them, and where we saw the workers trying to tackle the situation, and they received radioactive burns on their legs and feet because they were in a pool of radioactive water that seeped into the boots and were not protected enough for them they have actually absorbed radiation into their bodies, two of the workers have, and the doctors say the prognosis is not looking good. a bit of good news, finally, from japan, and that is tokyo's tap water and the radioactive isotopes they found on when is back in safe levels and has not stopped people fro
: international forces attack muammar qaddafi's military. u.s. and coalition fighters flying more than 150 air anythings over north africa nation and firing 16 cruise missiles in the past 24 hours according to a spokesman after nato agreed last night to assume command of the no-fly zone. but united states and other allied forces are in charm of the rest of the world in including attacks on the ground forces which is the toughest part of the operation and the most controversial. the quick exit does not appear likely and now steve harrigan in the libyan capital but first over to the pentagon. the transition of command is happening. what does it mean? >> we are told from a senior nato official it is being transitioned and it will take 72 hours before general ham can hand over to the nato command structure and the new lieutenant general, the canadian lieutenant general is put in charge of the no-fly zone. the enforcement of the no-fly zone will still be robust. this is not going to just be planes looking for aircraft in the sky. it will be a robust enforcement of the no-fly zone. listen to investi
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
is this supposed to work? >> well, good morning, betty. the u.s. makes no quick exit from libya, as it had hoped. nato does take over the no-fly zone, but the u.s. remains firmly in charge of the brunt of the combat there. american warplanes will continue to fly strike missions over libya, for now. >> this operation has already saved many lives. but the danger is far from over. >> reporter: thursday, nato agreed to take over partial command from the u.s. the 28-nation alliance could begin enforcing the no-fly zone as early as this weekend. but american forces would still be involved in everything from surveillance to bombing specific targets. >> we will continue to apply the pressure we can to compel them to stop killing their own people. >> reporter: coalition jets pounded the country for a sixth straight day thursday, hitting a military base, and a libyan plane that violated the no-fly zone. still, government forces continued their assault on rebels in the western city of misrata. hospitals there were inundated with victims. while natos aagreed to only a partial takeover, that could soon chang
are overwhelmed. >>> in sendai, japan, there are signs of recovery. u.s. marines are busy there helping to clear away cars and other debris left in the tsunami's wake. >> we've been clearing it for the past few days, so we're making good progress. >>> let's head to tokyo and nbc's lee cowan who's developing stories there. >> reporter: it all stems from the injuries to the workers we talked about yesterday, the ones that were in the basement level of unit number three. they were trying to strip a cable there. they came in contact with radioactive water and had to be taken to the water. they were actually transferred to a hospital here in tokyo today so they could monitor their condition a little more closely. the consider is that the radiation levels were so high, and the water they stepped in, some 10,000 times that it should be, that the fear is now there is some kind of leak at the reactor itself. they don't know whether it's an actual breach in the core or the pipes themselves that are leaking but something is leaking. we don't know how much or how long it's been leaking and we don't know why
the wheel. assistant u.s. attorney john siroka asked the judge to impose a 20-year sentence for the, quote, disregard that jones showed, especially after prior traffic and substance convicts. the defense asked for mercy. jones addressed the court, turning his head slightly toward the spectators and saying to the family, i am truly sorry and then turning back toward the judge and adding i hope one day they find it in theirer hearts to for-- their hearts to forgive me. the superior judge wasup moved grimly pointing out the defendant was arrested 13 times the last 10 years, convicted five times and was forbidden to drive. the sentence, 20 years. >> the real enemy in my men -- opinion is not mr. jones but the easy access to drugs, and i think unless and until we can do something to stem the tide, we will have unfortunate tragedies like this again. >> reporter: the physical injuries to all four children have mostly healed but they're still traumatized about the death of their mother. >> >>> a heartbreaking accident in laurel. the prince georges county police report a mother was dropping her two
the region. i think we might be able to take that decision with the coming days. >> the pentagon says u.s. war jets will still bomb libyan targets only now under a nato id command. also providing logisticalta support but secretary of state hillary clinton says that the u.s. has already dialed back. >> nate so well suited to coordinating this international effort a ensuring that all participating nations are working effectively together toward our shared goals. >> thenited arab emiratedasf announced today 12 of its fighter jets will patrol the no-fly zone. 6 warplanes from qatar are already in place at a military base in greece. rebel fighters trying to hit the hard-hit down got a break today. bombing ed armored vehicles outside there. it hit gadhafi's forces because they were targeting civilians. not to help the rebels. >>> and air traffic controller at rean national airport has been suspended. federal investigators say that he fell asleep on the jobearly wednesday morning forcing two commercial jetliners to land on their own. the controller, a 20-year veteran, was the only one on duty. >
minister resigns. jenna: also new developments in yemen, a key u.s. ally and central battleground against al-qaida, antigovernment demonstrators pouring into a square in the city's capitol calling for an end to the regime and they may just get it. the president there announcing today he will step down on certain conditions. reenaninan is live in jerusalem with more. >> reporter: you know, what we are seeing now just in the past few hours for the very first time the leaders of syria and yemen have decided to send out their own progovernment protestors to match the antigovernment protesters in the street, that's something that hasn't happened yet in the back and forth. in yemen the president announced that he's willing to hand over the reigns of power there but it has to be to someone he approves of. he claims he doesn't want to see his country descend into civil war and he announced that to his supporters today. he has been ruling yemen for more than 30 years, but still thousands of antigovernment protesters continue to take to the streets to defy the government and call for him to resign
ago, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said airplanes from the united arab emirates would be joining the no-fly zone. >> final preparations for these french pilots as they contemplate another mission over libya. france was at the forefront of the diplomatic flight to get a no flight -- a no-fly zone it installed, and now they're actively involved in maintaining it. while their mission is clear, who controls the international mission has been less so until now. >> nato allies have decided to enforce the no-fly zone over libya. we are taking action as part of the broad international efforts to protect civilians against the attacks by the khadafy regime. >> that will be music to the years of the u.s. government, which four days has been seeking to reduce the level of american involvement in policing the no- fly zone. news of the agreement brought this response from the secretary of state. >> nato is well-suited to coordinating this international effort and ensuring that all participating nations are working effectively together towards our shared goal. this coalition includes
is you are not entirely convinced u.s. forces will be on the ground in libya. as you answer that question, this was apparently one of the president's first demands. no american boots on the sands in libya. why could you think that could change? >> i think they can get into a stalemate. the only way they will be able to win is to put in, quote, a stablization force. because i think the tribes in tripoli versus the tribes in benghazi, the fact is, they could go to a stalemate and we are looking like we did in april, may, june of 2003 in iraq. you have those dissident forces. those tribes that do not wants to be ruled by the tribes coming from benghazi that you will have a counter insurgency. and we have seen that movie before. bill: your points is the rebels would not be able to hold on to a win. >> right. using the logic of our intervention in libya should we not be in syria, bahrain, north korea, iran, or yemen? a lot of countries. why libya, general? >> that's the question that befuddles me. i believe it's this responsibility to protect strategy that samantha powers conceived and has bee
. as of right now it appears that u.s. warplanes will still lead the more difficult mission, attacking the gadhafi ground forces. nbc's jim maceda is live. and richard engel live from the town offage agefag agfag agfafe . >>> we're getting confirmation three months plus or mys now. obviously there'll be adjustments. that mission should begin early next week. there will be dozens of planes from 28 nato countries including the two arab countries, qatar and the eub. right now nato is going to decide on sunday, no latter than tuesday on those two missions, the no-fly zone patrol obviously but also that they be caring out those air-to-ground strikes or will it keep it the way things are and have that done by the u.s.-led coalition. also the no-fly zones by the gadhafi forces. # in reality that's probably two or three fighter jets. there were air strikes, andrea, in tripoli overnight. a number of explosions. after the first time in a week they could another hear the artillery fire in the skies. also there's an ongoing war of the air waves if you will. the latest being a funeral. many of the
their leaders. listen. one u.s. ally calls the situation there, quote, deteriorating rapidlyof. remember, some officials are calling yemen the new wild west for al qaeda terrorists. we'll get to all of that in a minute. >>> first, mubarak is gon in egypt. gadhafi is under siege in libya. is bashar assad next? that's the question today rumbling across the middle east because the spark of rolution s reached the arab powerhouse syria. this is damascus today.ot antigovernment protests spread to the syrian capital and beyond. here's where it started, daraa, south of damascus. believe it or not, we are told with all the arrests about a month ago, a dozenz teen sz ho it started. they were arrested for spraying antigovernment graffiti. then on wednesday, this government forces opened fire in daraa. accounts remain sketchy, but the tape we're about to watch does give us some idea. as we sa, the exact circumstances remain unclear, as do the numberof deaths. but yesterday the government conceded it made a mistake and announced new reforms. today's sponse from the sreet suggests that may not be enough. w
simply to stay indoors. the u.s. and other countries have set a much wider evacuation zone for their people, 80 kilometers or 50 miles from daiichi. >>> now, we've all gotten a crash course in nuclear physics over the past two weeks or so, but to understand the impact of are possible containment breachi want to bring in at. scientist. bill nye, the science guy, joins us live from l.a., and bill knows all about this. bill, good to see you. would a leaking reactor core which we m be seeing here, would it be a major escalation of this disaster or just simply another complication? >> it's probably a major escalation. now, if it's not the core that's cracked, it's some plumbing, some pipes, that lead into it. because when you get this knd of radioactivity level going up so fast, it's probably plutonium. now, this sounds like science fiction, and it kind of is. u transmute uranium into plutonium by giving it a jolt. you change someneutrons into protons and it becomes fantastically radioactive. and glen cyborg himself who won abel prize for creating plutonium, told me it's toxic a
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
with dan lothian. >> reporter: carol you know the u.s. has now taken the bk seat in libya, but will still play a key ro in protecting innocent p civilians nap story at the top of the hour. >>> i'm ted rollins in los angeles where there are several japanese supermarkets and concern at those markets over radiated food coming from japan. that story coming up next hour. >> thanks, guy. >>> also ahead in the next hour, great deals on good stuff. millions looking for coupons on groupons. how they acty work. pancakes! ♪ from dawnl suns, i'll never walk away ♪ ♪ blueberry pancakes are so good ♪ [ male annoceancake love. professional driver on a closed course. ♪ do not attempt at home. always wear your seat belt. ♪ and please drive responsibl [ male announcer ] it's the most fun you can gay ha. see your authorized mercedes-benz deal for exceptional offers on the c-class. >>> oh, big excitement in the basketball world. i guess the defending champions arout? >> oh, duke is done. >> oh. >> just when you thought they might be making a run for a repeat championship, the number one seeded bl
. officials says the u.s. launched 15 more tomahawk missiles in the last 24 hours this around tripoli. there were also new coalition air strikes against gadhafi's artillery and tank positions, including those vowing to overtake the key rebel-held city of ajdabiya in eastern libya. u.s. officials tell nbc news the u.s. could hand over the lead role to nato as soon as tomorrow. it appears for now u.s. warplanes will lead the difficult mission of attacking gadhafi's ground forces that could threaten libyan civilians. mike viqueira joins us live from the white house. we just learned president obama should be holding a conference call with members of congress. what are you hearing? >> reporter: that's right. jay carney appeared in the briefing room 12 minutes and informed us the president conducted a national security council meeting on the situation in libya this morning, and starting right about now, 2:00, it was scheduled to begin. the president will be calling congressional leaders, a conference call, where he will, quote, consult with them on the situation in libya. and of course, the
and 19 miles to evacuate. you remember the u.s. evacuation zone is 50 miles away from the fukushima plant. now they are expanding it to get closer to where we are on this. so far the evacuation is voluntary, it could become mandatory if the conditions get worse. as we mentioned at the top of this hour there are fears that there could be a genuine breach in one of those nuclear reactors. as soon as we get more on that we will bring it right to you. and this week america's top prosecutor attorney general eric holder met with police chiefs to discuss the rising danger to police across this country. according to the latest statistics 50 enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty through march 24th of this year. that come mayor with 45 in the same period of 2010. this has been on the rise. there is a new push to protect those who work so hard and put their lives on the line to protect us. doug mckelway is live with more on this. good afternoon, doug. >> reporter: good afternoon, martha. what is most disturbing about that it is occurring at a time when violent crime and murder is gene
taking place there, then briefings that took place earlier today with the u.s. ambassador to libya. and white house press secretary carney announced that president obama will deliver a speech soon on libya and the region. and finally, more from french president sarkozy. but first, today's vote in the canadian house of commons, opposition members toppled prime minister stephen harper 166-145. we'll show you the vote and the comments of the prime minister and opposition leader, it's about an hour and a half. >> you're looking at a live shot on parliament hill. everyone on the inside is not as stately and calm as it is on the inside. they're waiting for a historic nonconfidence vote on an issue of contempt. that will make history. you're watching a special live edition of showdown in parliament. i want to welcome our viewers on the main network in saskatchewan and alberta. welcome to this unfolding story about our country and as we head toward an election, it will all hinge on what you're about to see in the matter of minutes ahead. we're waiting for the speaker of the house, peter mi
community to intervene to "stop the massacres." more now, from theodore kattouf. he served as u.s. ambassador to he served as u.s. ambassador to syria from 2001 to 2003, part of a 31-year career in the foreign service, most of it in the middle east. and ammar abdulhamid is a liberal democracy activist whose anti-regime activities led to his exile from syria in 2005. he now lives in the u.s. and writes the blog "syria revolution digest." welcome to both of you. the reports are, ammar is that this started with the arrest of some teenagers in the town, some anti-regime graffiti. it has clearly group. how has it group, what is involved now. >> what you have to realize is the seeds of this revolution has been planted years ago. what you are talking about syria with the arrest of the children, we are talking about the immediate cause. but people got an idea that the times were suitable for a revolution, finally, when of course tunisia was made and managed to topple their regime and egyptians and we saw immediately how the spark really, or the wave of protests took ever o the region. a l
the news of the day. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house. weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also, supreme court oral arguments. on the weekend, you can see our signature programs. you can also watch our programming any time at c- span.org. it is all searchable on our c- span video library. we will be back to our cbc simulcast of the expected no- confidence vote coming up at 2:00 p.m. eastern in the canadian house of commons. the conservative budget plan was unveiled tuesday, immediately rejected by the three opposition parties. they write with four parties holding seats in the house of commons, in addition to liberals and conservatives, it is difficult for a single party to gain a majority. the no-confidence vote should be coming up in about a half-hour, and we will bring you live coverage, simulcast with the cbc. >> which government do you trust with the democratic institution? >> what canadians want is stability. they want a steady hand on the wheel, a strong government, jobs, the economy, economic growth. >> a very rowdy question period earlier today. t
. bbc news, tripoli. >> the general in charge of u.s. africa demand, leading coalition operations in libya, and said he does not expect operations to continue much longer. >> i do not think it will go on for very long time. and we have an opportunity to execute the requirements of the u.n. security council resolution. the most important part of which is to protect civilians. it is important to note with the net to a large degree by stopping the regime's attacks on benghazi. there are other places where civilians remain threatened by the regime. we are doing our best each and every day and night to protect the civilians. >> you are watching "bbc world news." still to come on the program -- more worries in japan around the fukushima nuclear plant. one of the reactors could be damaged. the countries involved and the military coalition over libya have been financing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign -- finessing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign to nato. matthew price reports. >> slowly, but surely, it is being transferred to nato. command rem
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
with a caveat. while nato will be in charge of enforcing the no-fly zone, it is the u.s. that will take the lead when it comes to the more difficult task of planning attacks on gadhafi's ground forces. even as the dictator promoted every soldier in his army today, the man leading the american mission is staying ca hard to make it hard for gadhafi and his troops to kill its own citizens and destroy property. but that is as i described yesterday, a delicate mission. >> nbc news chief news correspondent richard engel is in benghazi. what do we make of reports that gadhafi wants to meet with the opposition? >> we've heard many reports like that. we've also heard that gadhafi wants to send 2,000 people carrying olive branchs to benghazi, and one of the rebel opposition leaders said they're worried about this. they're worried it could be a trojan horse. they don't want these people to come into the city. they don't trust gadhafi at all to hold negotiations, they don't trust him to hold a cease-fire, and frankly don't want his representatives in benghazi or even close to where the rebels are. >> what a
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
their leader leave now. what does all this mean for the u.s. war on terror? >>> asleep in the tower. troubling questions about who is keeping watch at the nation's other airports as officials now confirm an air traffic controller was napping on the job. >>> it's friday. so do you have your office beer ready? apparently booze in the workplace is making a comeback. could it actually make us more productive? >>> we begin with the devastate nug develop in japan, radioactive contamination from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant more severe than first thought. japan's prime minister spoke just a short time ago, calling the situation there very grave and serious. nuclear safety officials now suspect a dangerous breach in the core of a reactor. the evacuation zone has expanded from a 12-mile radius. people who are up to 19 miles mr. the plant are being told to leave. >>> also this morning, japan's police agency says the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami has now topped 10,000. more than 17,000 are listed as missing. >>> let's go live to tokyo, nbc's lee cowan is there. lee, wh
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)